new release

Category: new release

I first stumbled across rumours of a woman accompanying Wolseley’s expedition to Red River in an appendix to George Stanley’s 1989, Toil and Trouble. There, Stanley points to Chief engineer Simon Dawson’s observation that was made in his official report on the Expedition: “I may draw attention to the fact that…a gentleman who had his wife with him, passed over all the rapids, portages and whirlpools of the Winnipeg without its occurring to their occupants that they were doing anything extraordinary.”

One of the things I used to comfort myself with when COVID-19 first appeared on the scene, waaaay back at the beginning of 2020 (are we done yet?), was that at least this wasn’t Ancient Egyptian times! That may sound odd, but I was in the midst of editing the second book in my series, The Desert Prince, which picks up with healer Sesha and her friends, where The Lost Scroll of the Physician leaves off.

Most people will remember 2020 as the year of COVID-19; a year that was downright awful. And for good reason, of course — the pandemic wreaked havoc on the world, ruining lives, shuttering businesses, and crippling the economy. A year ago, nobody could have predicted we’d all be donning face masks or lining up for groceries; that stadiums and playgrounds would be closed, office towers vacated. Travelling abroad? Forget about it. The risks of catching and spreading COVID were not worth the reduced price of airfare. In fact, the only place that felt safe was in the closed comfort of home.

Sometimes, when life and art overlap it’s a happy synchronicity. Other times not so happy when a friend experiences an over-long recovery from COVID and her doctor has nothing to suggest. She typed, “We can’t garden without needing naps; we can’t take walks; even grocery shopping leaves us all exhausted for days. You know about managing fatigue from your character Jan in those Falls books. Can you suggest anything we can try?”

I’m a tired parent right now. I’m fatigued from trying to figure out what inside activity to do with the kids each weekend. I’m worn out from booking a COVID test every time one of us gets a cold. And I’m burnt out from trying to figure out how to be okay and raise kids that are okay while the world feels so scary and out of control. What makes this even harder is that us parents are trying to navigate this within what I call the culture of impossible parenting.

The culture of impossible parenting works hard to convince parents of six core (and annoying) messages.

 

Musician Hayley Gene Penner grew up sharing the stage with her father, renowned children's entertainer Fred Penner. Now she has just released her debut solo album and published her memoir, both titled People You Follow. In her deliciously entertaining memoir, Hayley traces her career as a songwriter moving from Winnipeg to L.A., along the way digging into her past relationships to unearth stories that delicately straddle ethical and unethical behaviour, self-protection, and self-destruction.

The longest two weeks of my life were the two weeks before the release of my debut novel, Night Call.

It’s sort of a surreal feeling as, on one hand, I’m very proud of this accomplishment and all the work it’s taken, and at the same time, I’m stuck between excited and anxious, seeing as this publication coincided with the endgame of my graduate degree in chemistry. This novel is the starting point of a completely new chapter of my life, and I have no idea where it’ll take me.

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